Wednesday, 6 June 2012

Etsy's Unique and Handmade Problems

If I’m going to write about Etsy, I should probably begin by saying that up until this past spring, I loved Etsy. Etsy was, if not in exactly in my blood, then so often on my mind that it seemed to be nestled among my neurons. Before a recent job loss, I was on Etsy nearly daily doing searches and making sure no one else had bought any of the items I had favourited. I just can’t tell you much it meant to me that I, a super-picky and budget-minded and so-seriously-retro-that-I’m-anachronistic shopper who comes home empty-handed from most of her trips to the Eaton Centre, could type a few search terms on Etsy and then browse through pages of items that are at least in the ball park of what I want. Between March 2010 and March 2012, I made 79 purchases on Etsy. Etsy helped me rebuild my jewelry collection after it was wiped out by a burglary (my second, sigh) in January 2010. Etsy made it possible for me to have a mostly non-cheesy collection of swan items. Etsy helped me find very specific gifts for assorted gift-giving occasions. Etsy helped me find affordable Art Nouveau antiques for my 1912-built house. Etsy has an enormous selection of goods, many of which are at very reasonable prices, and numerous talented, hard-working, honest and well-mannered sellers.

But for all its good points, Etsy has its flaws, which range from slightly annoying to the truly ugly, and when one of its failings manifested itself in an outright fiasco this past April, I became unwilling to shop there any longer.

Etsy claims to be an online marketplace strictly for hand-crafted and vintage goods. Their site policy states that vendors can only sell items that are either substantially handmade by the seller, craft supplies, or vintage items, and Etsy defines vintage as meaning the item is at least 20 years old. It’s a great policy which has allowed them to corner a niche in the marketplace. Unfortunately Etsy does not make an honest effort to enforce the policy. The site is rife with mass-produced goods that are available at much lower prices on eBay and Amazon.

I was trying to give Etsy the benefit of the doubt that they were at least attempting to enforce their policy and finding it beyond their capabilities, until this past April. On April 20th Etsy posted an interview with a featured seller, Mariana Schechter, owner of Etsy shop Ecologica, who claimed she designs and makes handmade furniture from salvaged wood. She said in the interview that, “So many designers and craftspeople eventually mass produce their products. Mass production makes it easier to sustain bigger profit margins, but it takes away from the individuality of each item”, and added, “There is something personal and unique that occurs when you craft something with your hands.”

Of course this all sounded beautifully in line with the Etsy mandate, until April 21st, when Schechter was exposed and proven to be a wholesale importer whose supposedly handmade goods are entirely factory-made and shipped to her by a company called All From Boats, based in Indonesia.

On April 22, a full day after the news broke, a coffee table from the Ecologica was among the handpicked items on the front page, and after a week or so of internet sturm und drang (read: Etsy and Regretsy and Metafilter threads of punishing length), Etsy took the official stance that Schechter’s business qualifies as a “collective” under their guidelines, and scolded their users for being meanies.

On June 5th, it was discovered that the Ecologica Malibu shop had been closed. Etsy will not say why. My own best guess is that Schechter closed her own shop because she wasn’t making many sales and/or had finally figured out she was never going to get any respect from the Etsy community again. But the kicker is Etsy has not removed the Featured Seller article about Schechter. Etsy's shameless disregard of their own site policy is stunning. My suspicion is that Schechter’s import business paid them for the featured seller spot, and if that’s the case Etsy can’t remove it without breach of contract.

Of course, this matter was simply an especially dramatic boiling over of problems that have been bubbling for a long time.

Etsy has long failed to set any sort of threshold as to the quality of the goods for sale on its site. There are people on Etsy selling—or trying to sell—rusted tin cans, pieces of scrap wood, filthy and damaged old toys, and other items that are neither handmade nor vintage. An item’s presence in Etsy's vintage or handmade categories is in no way an assurance that the item is actually vintage or handmade. There are "vintage" Blackberries for sale, as well as many other less obviously new and mass-produced goods. I’ve certainly been taken. A necklace I once bought from the vintage category was no more vintage than my 2012 daytimer because I saw the necklace—and matching earrings!—at a kiosk in the mall the week after my necklace arrived in the mail. There are also many copyright infringments. And even when items for sale are described honestly, it can be very difficult and time consuming for a buyer to find a specific desired item because the search functionality is so crude.

All of these problems hurt sellers who are trying to sell genuinely handcrafted or vintage goods. They can’t charge prices that are competitive with those charged for mass-produced goods, their goods are hard to find among the sea of mass-produced offerings, and the customers they are trying to reach are being driven away from Etsy entirely because it’s not offering the kind of merchandise it claims.

Even before the Mariana Schechter charade, Etsy wasn’t making any discernible effort to weed out the outright crap and site policy violations. Items flagged as violating site policy remained in place. Indeed, Etsy sometimes promotes such items by featuring them on their front page collections of "handpicked items". These handpicked items are clearly selected to suit a colour scheme or topical theme, not on their own intrinsic merit, with the result that while the photo collections make the front page look pretty, the practical value of it to buyers is vanishingly slight and vendors who are selling garbage but who can take artistic product shots get bonus traffic to their shops, while vendors with much better wares do not.

I was glad to see Etsy has at least retired one of their more useless features, the "You might like" recommendations. I found them so absurdly off the mark as to be completely useless. Why on earth would Etsy think I might like a Simplicity clown costume pattern or a book on how to draw Woody the Woodpecker? Is it because I searched on Etsy for a skort pattern and a clown costume seemed like the next logical step? Or were they hoping in some oblique way to warn me away from that slippery slope?

By far the most disturbing feature of their business practices is their treatment of Etsy sellers. I have read accounts of former sellers having their listings or entire shops closed arbitrarily and without warning, leaving the sellers with no way retrieve their product images and descriptions, without any refund of listing fees that were supposed keep their goods visible and available for sale for several months, and worst of all with no way to contact their buyers and arrange for the delivery of the goods they’ve paid for. Etsy also seems to offer very little protection or assistance for buyers who are running into problems with dishonest sellers.

And another very serious Etsy business misstep is their refusal to allow any dissent on their site and heels-dug-in refusal to respond constructively, or even, sometimes, lucidly, to customer and vendor complaints. When an Etsy member asked in the forums why there was a crumbling old brick among the featured products on the front page, she was told not to call out in the forums.

When a reseller shamelessly posted in the forums asking for tips on how to sell her "handmade" notebooks and another Etsy user politely replied that she can’t sell her notebooks on Etsy because they are not handmade but mass-produced, the commenter was told not to call out in the forums.

When an Etsy seller was told she can’t sell her Mr. T album in her shop because Etsy had “received a copyright infringement complaint from an agent representing Mr. Chuck Norris” and the seller replied meekly that her listing didn’t mention Mr. Norris in any way, she was told Etsy didn’t have the information to reply to her question and that she must contact Mr. Norris’s representative. Yes, you read that right.

If Etsy wants to be a successful and respected site, much less a community, as its creation of forums and "friend circles" and other features would indicate, it needs to show respect and consideration for its users by allowing a certain amount of open negotiation and conflict and by having the courtesy to listen and respond to their complaints. And too, they need to understand what a resource their users' suggestions and criticisms and flagging of unacceptable items can be.

Etsy so far seems completely unwilling to allow dissent on the site, and nature's abhorrence of a vacuum is nothing compared to the average internet denizen's refusal to accept a lack of space in which to complain. It didn't take long for some independent venues appear. If you have problems with Etsy's practices, you can post to the Consumer Affairs site, or to SiteJabber.

Other sites have sprung up to address Etsy’s business practices: Callin’ Out on Etsy; Etsy Bitch; The Etsy Refugee Society; and the inevitable Facebook group (and I’m sure there are more Facebook groups along that line).

Not only is there much to criticize about Etsy's business practices, making fun of Etsy's wares is an end and a pleasure in itself. My friend Jacquilynne launched a web site called "The Good, the Bad, and the Etsy" back in June 2009. She would critique three pieces of Etsy merchandise daily, and usually it happened that one would be a well-crafted item while the other two would be hilariously badly crafted or perhaps well-made but deeply weird. I fondly remember two of her reviews in particular. In one she referred to a top with a demure, pieced calico front view and half laced-up, half-bare back view as "Amish in the front, Rumspringa in the back". And when reviewing a $1500 needlepoint cushion depicting an erect and graphically detailed penis with the motto, "It won’t suck itself", Jacquilynne headlined her critique with a succinct, "For $1500, It Should".

The Good, the Bad and the Etsy was building momentum nicely when Jacquilynne decided to close it down just two months after its inception because she was receiving death threats from unhinged Etsy sellers who had taken umbrage to her snarking on their crafts. Again, you read that right. Death threats.

As The Good, the Bad, and the Etsy had been posted to the front page of Metafilter and Jacquilynne and I are both members, I initiated a MetaTalk thread to inform the other members of what had happened, and it became a meaty discussion about the value and boundaries of critical discourse. I recommend the thread as interesting reading in its own right.

Jacquilynne clarified her decision to discontinue the blog in the thread:
To be clear, I didn't take the blog down because I felt like I was in danger (internet death threats—ooh scary!), but I was already feeling sort of bad about one person who emailed me and seemed genuinely sad that I'd mocked her item, and I got a couple of threats in a couple of hours, it suddenly all seemed not worth it.
Etsy can’t be held responsible for the behaviour of their sellers off-site, of course, but Jacquilynne’s experience does indicate that one of the site's problems is a faction of Etsy sellers who have neither talent nor the discernment to realize their own lack of ability, and who can't behave like adults when anyone says so.

Of course, I probably don’t have to tell anyone who has read this far about the most successful Etsy complaint and snark blog there is, Regretsy—I couldn’t even get this far through the review without having to link to it multiple times.

Regretsy is owned and operated by the wickedly and incisively satirical April Winchell, and on Regretsy she daily serves up the dregs of Etsy with generous dollops of snark sauce and side orders of pie charts and Photoshop, and has gotten a few book deals in the process. Winchell skewers Etsy for all its flaws and excesses, posts about everything from the serious problems I’ve mentioned to more minor nitpicks such as product shots of food with hairs twined in among the goodies on the plate, unintentionally hilarious misspellings in posters or wall decals offered for sale, poorly made or useless "crafts" such as a necklace that consists of a paperclip on a piece of stiff wire, artwork that is supposed to depict a certain celebrity and looks nothing like said celebrity, hideous and unwearable clothing, vendors who use words that do not actually mean what they seem to think, gratuitous nudity in product shots, and Etsy’s many twee pretensions. Winchell and her many readers sometimes manage to embarrass Etsy’s staff into addressing at least some of its more minor problems. And not incidentally, Winchell and her readers have also raised tens of thousands of dollars for various charitable causes and given specific items, such as new sewing machines, to Etsy vendors in need. The site, which has developed its own culture and momentum, is a lot of fun and also serves the greater public good in a very concrete way. If I didn’t already think the whole "people who make fun of other people's creative work are fat jealous losers who can't do anything worthwhile themselves" was one very dumb canard, I would after seeing what April Winchell has accomplished with Regretsy. Criticism can be fruitful as well as an end in itself.

I’ll try to avoid recapping any of Winchell's posts here because there's really no equivalent to reading them oneself. There's a lot of scope in making fun of Etsy. Not only is it satisfying to see Etsy outed for its many hypocrisies and legion absurdities, but sometimes some of the offerings on Etsy, while genuinely handmade and well-crafted, are so jaw-droppingly bizarre that Regretsians marvel at and celebrate them rather than making fun of them. April Winchell has had to categorize her many posts and the entire list of categories can be found here. Some of my favourite categories are Garbage; Compare and Save; Dead Things and a sub category within Dead Things, Tragicrafting; Not Remotely Handmade; Not Remotely Steampunk; Annoying Descriptions; Peck of the Day (in which Winchell makes fun of the senselessness of the choices for the Handpicked items on the front page); and for the truly unclassifiable, Don’t Ask Me.

In one favourite post of mine, which involved Winchell’s recap of a Etsy "Featured Seller" article, Winchell employed something I’ll describe as a Wank-O-Meter to measure the level of fatuous pretension in the article. Spoiler: it's a very high level. Moreover, one can almost smell Sartoria's studio through the computer screen.

While many Etsy vendors are wonderfully good sports about having their items mocked and appreciate the increased traffic and sales that Regretsy always brings their way (after all, purchases are paid for in government tender whether bought in a spirit of irony or while "under the influence" or in sober and sincere appreciation), some aren’t. As in Jacquilynne’s experience, some of the Etsy crafters whose items are mocked on Regretsy don’t seem to have much more maturity, self-control, basic literacy skills, or grasp of what does and does not constitute illegal behaviour than they do esthetic sensibility. Winchell therefore gets her own share of hate mail, which she opportunely turns into fodder for more Regretsy posts in her Mailbag category. My favourite of these letters was a classic from a person who threatens to call a "layer" and get a "crease and desist".

All snark (or most of it) aside, as I see it, Etsy only has two viable ethical options, the first being that Etsy begins to enforce its own policies, to make every effort to close resellers down as efficiently as possible (they would never get them all) and remove any Featured Seller spots involving resellers. And in this case Etsy should also apologize to the community for not doing so earlier, as it has been dishonest to claim to be promoting handmade goods while knowingly allowing resellers on the site.

Alternatively, Etsy should admit they’ve become dependent on resellers to keep the site profitable (and that's understandable, not judging Etsy for that), and announce that from now on they will be allowing resellers but their products will be strictly labelled and categorized as such. If they have received payment from resellers for Featured Seller spots, they must come clean about that and promise users that from now on paid advertisements will be completely distinct from any editorial content, and promise that they will do their utmost to make sure the handmade categorization can be trusted by all users. And apologize to the community for not doing so earlier.

Both of the paths involve making some changes and disclosures and apologizing to the Etsy community. There is no way around that. There are also other changes that need to be made, such as setting some sort of standard for goods offered on Etsy, treating their vendors better, improving the search functionality, allowing honest dissent on the site, and just in general listening to and learning from the criticisms made of Etsy.

But at present I don’t have any reason to believe we’re going to see Etsy make a real effort to clean itself up. And I believe what will happen is Etsy will slowly decline.

At present Etsy has a reputation for being the go-to site for handmade goods and are valued at more than $600 million according to the The Wall Street Journal, but they can’t coast on an undeserved reputation forever. The Etsy "handmade" brand will become increasingly derided. Etsy will gradually lose their frustrated artisan sellers and their disappointed customers to other sites that offer genuinely handmade goods and treat their users with more respect, such as ArtFire.

Gradually Etsy will become eBay, only smaller, with higher prices and transparent dishonesty, and they’ll find out they can’t compete with eBay on those terms. And there’s an ironic justice in this. Etsy has forced their artisans to compete with sellers hawking mass-produced goods labeled as handmade, and they’ll eventually find themselves pitting these "handmade" wares against a juggernaut vendor selling reams of mass-produced goods for far better prices.

That’s my prediction. Of course, I could be wrong, or even if I am right, Etsy may manage to stick around and stay profitable for many years to come, but meanwhile, I have done my bit to protest Etsy's dishonesty and mismanagement by closing my Etsy account, discouraging my father, who is a talented woodworker, from opening an Etsy shop, and by writing and posting two Metafilter posts and this review to let people know exactly what Etsy’s all about. And then too, I keep in mind that there are compensations in Etsy’s continued survival, namely that Regretsy is ying to Etsy’s yang, and so long as Etsy refuses to mend its ways, Regretsy can go right on trumpeting the fact that Etsy’s ass is showing through its "reclaimed crocheted afghan" pants.

13 comments:

resonanteye said...

I love this post. I always want to know how buyers, collectors, feel using etsy- as a seller there I am often frustrated and infuriated (I'm moving to my own site because of all the things you've talked about here!)

The hard thing, from this end, is that no other site has the traffic and momentum. Sellers have been promoting etsy instead of their own or any other site for years, so there is traffic- and I've noticed that since moving things to selling direct from my own site, it becomes a lot harder to get seen.

I have started seeking out all the artists I want to buy from, elsewhere online (searching their usernames on google, so I can find their other shops, or their own sites) and buy direct from them instead of purchasing on etsy.

Thanks for this blog, it cheers me to see that buyers totally get it too.

JewelRenee said...

What a wonderful read! You've hit on exactly what's wrong, funny and sad about Etsy. I wish they'd try to be honest and diligent, but hey wish in one hand... that reminds me, I have to find a new source for poo shaped soap.

Cindy D. said...

Hahaha, those pants you linked to at the end, wow! Great article. I'm staying at Etsy for now, in the 2D art category which isn't quite as affected, but you make very good points. Maybe it's just too huge to police properly. Of course that assumes they have any interest in doing so. Aaaah, I could talk about it for ages. In any case, thank you for providing all this great information. :)

Peg Bowles said...

The etsy seller complaint happened to me yesterday. I have had a shop since February of 2008. I had a few short of 1000 sale, 437 positive feedback - all positive feedback. Yesterday etsy complained that an embroidered bib listing on my site ($6 listing) which had the words "hello world" violated a copyright. Hours later my 4 year old site was down permanently. Nevermind that no one would think that the words hello world could belong to someone. Nevermind that there are currently 289 other listings that have the words hello world on them and those listings remain untouched. Etsy would not even listen to the explanation that no ill intent existed. So now, I have a new site at Luulla.com.
I am hoping they will treat their sellers better. Etsy is clearly overly taken with itself. I am disgusted. Etsy clearly did not appreciate the revenue I generated for them or the beautiful custom embroidered items that my customers loved.
Peg Bowles
Initial Impressions

Stormily Yours said...

Wow thank you for this post! I am launching my business in the upcoming weeks and had planned on using Etsy, but after reading this and posts on Regretsy I am not sure anymore. Honestly when I was first deciding who to sell through I decided on Etsy since it's well known for handmade crafts (I'll be selling handmade metaphysical items) but now... Maybe I'll go back to considering building my own site, which is what I wanted initially.

Peg Bowles said...

Update to my comment on November 16 - I was able to get my etsy site back up again after a retraction of the complaint by the lawyer involved. I never intended etsy to be my main site. I do have my own website, but etsy has been a nice sideline. That said, I do think that etsy is very uncaring about its sellers. They seem to act first (and arbitrarily) and ask questions later.

MISCH said...

Interesting,.I think Etsy might be looking for a buyer.....

swati said...

You may want to check-out Storemate.com and artfire.com as good alternatives.
If you want something different try out storemate.com, I registered on storemate.com and seen some sharp increase in the traffice directed to my website.
Unlike easy and artfire they are not restricted to handmade, I get to promote to a bigger audience (all design buffs).
The best about storemate is, I get to help out my customers in real-time using their 'Talk-About' feature. Helping out with questions on custom options, shipping queries etc in realtime.
I even passed on exclusive discounts to them during these help-out sessions, which turned casual enquiries into quick sales and followers for me.
I have been Storemate's "Featured Designer" for 3 weeks, straight! ( My proud moment!) :D

Peg Bowles said...

I have a good following on etsy - with 1100 sales. I decided to try Artfire last fall, but got no traction whatsoever. I also tried luula.com and have had a few sales there.

Peg Bowles
Initial Impressions
www.initial-impressions.net
etsy store - initialimpressions

Jewelry said...

It is unfortunate to hear that you had some problems with Etsy, have you looked into other shops such as The Craft Star?

Anonymous said...

I was thinking about selling on etsy but the more I looked at it, it seemed that the sellers were only selling lovie-dovie kitsch that was perhaps decorative but useless.
They may have been hand-made but seemed to be copies of Made in China junk that you can buy at any gift store.

Kathijane said...

Wish I had read this before I started using the site. After closing up shop after the New Guidelines went into effect, I am left sickened by what I now see so clearly.

Anonymous said...

thank god I found you!!!! I have been selling my assemblage jewelry on etsy a little less than a year. I knew that things just didn't seem right there. when I would go look for something I would have to peel thru hudreds of pages of junk jewelry from china!! I just stopped looking and shop on ebay for stuff, its just a lot easier. my real complaint is they removed 7 of my neg. fb from a seller who has a history of bait and switch gem selling without any contact or reason. they did it to another woman also about the same seller. they block free speech and I never got any real definitive answer from them. but I know why its because the gem seller has been on etsy for yrs. and brings in big bucks for them. well the same week I was trying to get an answer and told them the review policy was a big joke because they remove fb whenever they want and they don't even have a posted review policy for users to read!! then today coincidentally they removed 2 of my jewelry pieces that had prebanned ivory saying it was against policy! well there are literally 72 pages of people selling scrimshaw, prebanned ivory, even ivory tusk. and some long time well known jewelry sellers who have written jewelry assemblage books are selling now and have recently just sold ivory assemblage jewelry!! but because I was strongly disagreeing about them removing my neg. fb this week they decided to harass me about the ivory jewelry I was selling by getting there revenge and removing my listings!! I told them how childish and immature to single me out for this when it is plain to see etsy doesn't enforce there no bone or prebanned ivory from endangered species!! so many things about the site are just wrong, it seems like its run by some closed old mens group that wants to block free speech and have total control over everything!! which is not what a handmade artist colony type site should be about!!! and then when I read this site , OH MY GOD THE SITUATION ON ETSY IS EVEN WORSE THAN I THOUGHT OR THAN MY EXPERIENCE!! I will be looking for other sites to share with frustrated etsy folks that are listed here. I feel so much better knowing that my feelings weren't crazy about what was going on there, there are some serious problem issues with etsy!